Tuesday, March 20, 2018
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.


Organizer(s): David Drake (University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA), Effie Ioannidou (University of Connecticut, USA)


Current evidence has supported the significance of faculty development as a tool for academic retention and advancement. In this process, mentoring holds tremendous significance as it guides post-graduate students towards their career goal and supports junior faculty in their academic growth. A key component of this is learning how to write competitive research grants. In today’s highly competitive environment at NIH and other funding agencies, these skills have become of even more paramount importance for young scientists to establish themselves as independent investigators.

This one-day workshop is designed to support the processes of mentoring and career development in a bidirectional way. First, it focuses on junior faculty and post-graduate students with the goal to enhance their grant-writing skills as part of an overall emphasis on research portfolio and scholarly productivity. Coinciding with this is the importance of building a close look at work/life balance expectations. In a parallel session, the workshop focuses on mentoring the mentors with a goal to promote effective communication skills, to address diversity and unconscious bias, to closely mentor mentees in all aspects of their academic growth and to present techniques to synchronize mentor and mentee expectations. The two parallel sessions will take place in the morning.

In the afternoon, small group interactive sessions will include a thematic menu available to participants. Each table will host one mentor with 4-5 mentees. All the mentors participating are highly experienced scientists, and most have also been awarded AADR Fellow status in recognition of their many scientific contributions and distinguished service to the Association. The objective of the small group sessions is to address a variety of topics, including but not limited to: federal or industry funding opportunities, writing a competitive and clear specific aims page, navigation of tenure policies and procedures, departmental requirements and expectations, startup and space negotiations, scholarly productivity (publications and citations), mentor selection, assembling a compelling Biosketch, job search and interview process and others.

Following the small group sessions, we expect to inspire and build an active and lasting mentoring network between the participants and the table mentors! We envision that this network will be maintained during the year via video conferencing approaches as needed.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. The workshop aims to mentor the mentors with a goal to promote effective communication skills, to address diversity and unconscious bias and to present techniques to synchronize mentor and mentee expectations.
  2. The workshop focuses on junior faculty and post-graduate students with the goal to enhance their grant-writing skills as part of an overall focus on research portfolio and scholarly productivity.
  3. The small group sessions aim to address a variety of topics related to securing a faculty/research position and securing funding in an interactive and informal manner.

 

Schedule

Welcome/Setting the Stage
Raul Garcia, AADR President (Boston University, Mass., USA) and Jack Ferracane, AADR Past-President (Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA)

Workshop Objectives and Process
Organizers David Drake (University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA) and Effie Ioannidou (University of Connecticut, USA)

Implicit Bias in Research and Academic Institutions
Anna Han (National Institute for Health, Bethesda, Md., USA)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

  1. Session for Mentors/Senior Faculty
    Mentoring the Mentors

    Judith Albino (University of Colorado, Denver, USA)

    Work/Life Balance: What is the Current Model?
    Flavia Teles (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA)

    Grant and Manuscript Writing: Guiding Junior Faculty to be Successful
    Toshi Kawai (NOVA Southeastern, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., USA)

  2. Session for Trainees/Junior Faculty
    NIH/NIDCR Funding Opportunities
    Lynn King (NIH/NIDCR, Bethesda, Md., USA)

    The Specific Aims Page-a Vital Window of Your Research Agent
    Jeffrey Engler (University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA)

    Time Investment for Junior Faculty: How to Teach and Implement
    Chitra Rajah (University at Buffalo, N.Y., USA)


LUNCH

BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Small group and table themes:

  • Securing a faculty/research position
    • Job application (personal letter) and process
    • Job interviewing tips and strategies
    • Startup and space negotiations
    • Tenure process and procedures
    • Mentor selection or how do I pick a mentor
    • Scholarly productivity
    • Work/life balance

  • Securing research funding
    • Peer-review process: training and contemporary tools
    • Writing effective specific aims
    • Design a compelling biosketch
    • Industry funding opportunities and how to navigate
    • Utilizing clinicaltrials.gov
    • Writing clinical protocols with SPIRIT
    • I got a K, now what?