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Journal of Dental Research Centennial May 2019: A History of Innovations in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Oral and Head and Neck Cancer

Alexandria, VA, USA – 2019 marks the Centennial of the Journal of Dental Research (JDR). Over the last century the JDR has been dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge and information on all sciences relevant to dentistry and to the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease.

To celebrate, the JDR is featuring a yearlong, monthly commemorative article and podcast series that highlights topics that have transformed dental, oral and craniofacial research over the past 100 years.

Oral and head and neck cancer constitute about 12% of all malignancies globally and it is estimated that a total of 400,000 cases of oral and pharyngeal cancer and 160,000 cases of laryngeal cancer will develop each year. In the May 2019 issue of the JDR, Peter J. Polverini, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA and Mark W. Lingen, University of Chicago, Illinois, USA discuss the history and future of oral and head and neck cancer in the article “A History of Innovations in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Oral and Head and Neck Cancer.”

“Historical records as far back as 3000 BCE show that oral and head and neck cancer was a disease process well known to Egyptian physicians,” said Polverini. “During the 20th century, evidence-based medicine catalyzed the development of rigorous science-based diagnostic and treatment protocols. The use of surgery, therapeutic radiation and chemotherapy as single treatment agents, or in combination with one another, have gradually emerged as the preferred approach to cancer therapy.”

“New technologies, such as the sequencing of the human genome, metabolomics and proteomics have provided the foundation for what we today call precision medicine,” said Lingen. “The future success of tailored medical treatment for cancer patients will depend on the discovery of new druggable targets with improved therapeutic efficacy. As the precision and sensitivity of existing tools for prevention and risk assessment improve, greater accuracy will be achieved in predicting health outcomes.”

The fifth JDR Centennial podcast, titled “A History of Innovations in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Oral and Head and Neck Cancer” features a conversation between Polverini and Lingen, moderated by JDR Associate Editor Jacques E. Nör, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA.

Throughout 2019 by JDR Associate Editor, Nicholas Jakubovics, Newcastle University, England, will include ‘Historical Highlights’ and archival excerpts from the rich history of research findings published in the JDR. In the May issue, Jakubovics highlights the article “Experimental Carcinogenesis in the Cheek Pouch of the Syrian Hamster” (Salley JJ. 1954. Experimental Carcinogenesis in the Cheek Pouch of the Syrian Hamster. J Dent Res. 33: 253-262) which presented the first immunocompetent animal model of head and neck cancer. Animal models are critical for investigating the complex processes involved in cancer development, and this paper is still widely recognized as starting the field of research.

The researchers first isolated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and reported them in a 2000 paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Their JDR article followed this up by characterizing DPSCs and showing that they have key stem cell properties including a capacity for self-renewal and an ability to differentiate into multiple cell types. DPSCs show great promise for clinical applications such as the restoration of tooth pulp. The large number of citations reflects the interest in this field and is in itself an indication of the importance of their work.

Along with the article and podcast series, the legacy of the JDR will be honored during a celebration at the 97th General Session of the IADR, held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the AADR and the 43rdAnnual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from June 19-22, 2019. For more information on the JDR Centennial, please visit www.iadr.org/JDRcentennial.

About the Journal of Dental Research
The IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research is a multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge in all sciences relevant to dentistry and the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease. The JDR ranks #2 in Impact Factor of 91 journals in the “Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine” category at 5.380, ranks #2 of 91 in Article Influence with a score of 1.546 and continues to rank #1 of 91 journals in Eigenfactor with a score of 0.02095. The JDR’s 5-year Impact Factor has remained above 5 for the third year at 5.715 — ranking #2 of 91 journals. With over 19,000 citations, the JDR also boasts the most citations in the “Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine” category.

About the International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a nonprofit organization with over 11,400 individual members worldwide, dedicated to: (1) advancing research and increasing knowledge for the improvement of oral health worldwide, (2) supporting and representing the oral health research community, and (3) facilitating the communication and application of research findings. To learn more, visit www.iadr.org. The American Association for Dental Research (AADR) is the largest Division of IADR with 3,300 members in the United States. To learn more, visit www.iadr.org/aadr.

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